Saturday, December 7, 2013

Week of Dec2



Kinder- I started class with reading selectively through Rookie Reader’s Chanukah (by Trudi Strain Trueit).  I wanted to make sure the students knew the idea of Chanukah being a Jewish holiday for eight days, and what a menorah, gelt, shamas, and dreidel were.  We reviewed that this was a nonfiction book.  Then I read How Does a Dinosaur Say Happy Hanukkah? By Jane Yolen and illustrated by Mark Teague.  The students had so much fun trying to decide if the dinosaurs were  good or bad.  We compared the dinosaurs to David from the David Shannon books. 

First- I reviewed the basics of Hanukkah: the history and key terms such as menorah, gelt, shamas, rabbi, temple, latkes and dreidel.  Then I read the book Zigazak! A Magical Hanukkah Night, but Eric A. Kimmel.  Students most enjoyed the trouble the goblins caused!  By the time we finished the book, it was time to get books out!

Second- I reviewed the basics of Hanukkah: the history and key terms such as menorah, gelt, shamas, rabbi, temple, latkes and dreidel.  Then I read the book Chanukkah Guest, but Eric A. Kimmel.  Students loved sharing about their elder family members difficulties in hearing and seeing!  I loved that they made that self to text connection!  After, students worked on putting Hanukkah words in ABC order, and a couple of classes had time to watch a short PBS Arthur video called Muffy Learns About Hanukkah. 

Third- I reviewed the basics of Hanukkah: the history and key terms such as menorah, gelt, shamas, rabbi, temple, latkes and dreidel.  Then I read the book Hershel and the Hanukkah Goblins, by Eric A. Kimmel.  Students enjoyed seeing the different ways Hershel outsmarted even the King of the Goblins.  By the time we finished the book, it was time to get books out!

Fourth- I talked to the students first about Patricia Polacco, and how much of her writing is auto-biographical of her childhood.  Then I read Trees of the Dancing Goats by Polacco.  We made a lot of connections between this book and the one they heard last week, Molly’s Pilgrim.  I had one class that was fascinated about the scarlet fever portion of the story!  The students and I then worked on summarizing several short paragraphs about Hanukkah.  This was very hard work for them!  But necessary to learn as we move into a research project next week.

Extra Fourth-I started with the book One Candle, by Eve Bunting.  Students were fascinated to learn that you really can create a candle with a potato, thread and butter!  After the story, we worked on summarizing our Hanukkah paragraphs a bit more.

Fifth- I had intended to read Snowflake Bentley to students, but found out that they have all heard the book too many times!  So each class chose a Hanukkah book for me to read.  After the book, students completed a library winter webquest.  This was from Library Sparks, December 2013 issue.  It gave me an opportunity to review with students a couple of search tips such as using :def after a word when they want to find the definition of a word.

Extra Fifth- We worked on internet safety on our extra day.  Students and I discussed how many websites ask for personal and/or private information when registering.  We learned to differentiate between personal and private, and students gave me lots of great examples of each.  I showed them word clouds of each, and we looked to see if we missed any.  My students came up with many more than what was on the word clouds!  I then directed students to abcya.com where they used a word cloud program to create word clouds about themselves, using only personal information.  Students really understood the difference and also really got that they should never give this kind of information out without parental consent!

Sixth- I started reading The Librarian Who Measured the Earth, by Kathryn Lasky.  I emphasized to students that I like the ancient Greek that the book is about, because of his curiosity for life.  I let them know that I am striving to cultivate that life- learner curiosity in them!  I read about half the book, then students explored our Grolier database to learn more about Eratosthenes.  I learned that we need to start working on how to cite sources in sixth grade!

Extra Sixth- This was another digital literacy lesson.  Students learned about using different search techniques, other than googling an entire question word for word!  They were then challenged to form teams of two or three and efficiently and effectively (key words from the lesson) find a city park in another place that had restrooms, was free, had coverage from inclement weather, and had room to play.  I was very impressed at how fast some teams found their answers!

Week of Nov. 25


Kinder- I read A Plump and Perky Turkey, by Teresa Bateman.  I had to laugh, because at first my students thought the characters were going to eat turkeys made of soap, potatoes and oatmeal and not use them to trick the turkey!  We also shared a short nonfiction book about turkeys and talked about the difference between fiction and non-fiction.

First- I only saw one first grade class this week, and I had not seen them last week, so I read One is a Feast for Mouse (Cox) and the students did a sequencing activity of the food the mouse piled up for his feast (this was last weeks lesson).

Second- First I read Thanksgiving at the Tappletons (Eileen Spinelli).  After we enjoyed the book, we did a Reader’s Theater version.  I have never tried RT with second grade before, but they did great!  And they really enjoyed it.

Third and Fourth- I shared the book Turk and Runt: A Thanksgiving Comedy, by Lisa Wheeler. One of the most fun parts of this story is doing all the voices of the characters!  I especially play those up because after we shared the story, we worked on a Readers Theater version of it.  I loved hearing students do their own versions of accents (great chance to work on expression and voice)!  We did not finish the entire thing so I have been made to promise the chance to finish another day!

Fifth and Sixth- Students played a game called Book Hunt 3.  I purchased this game from Upstart, and each team pulled a card that has 6 books they need to find.  There are multiple steps for each book.  For example, first they have to figure out who the author of a certain book is, and then be able to find another book by that same author.  Any team that found all 6 got a prize from the prize box.  Then everyone helped putting all those books back!!



Week of Nov 18




Kindergarten- This week I shared a book that all kinders love- David Gets in Trouble, by David Shannon.  Before I began, we talked about how last week’s book (How I Became a Pirate) was illustrated by David Shannon, but authored by someone else (Melinda Long).  Then we talked about how David Shannon does both jobs for this book.  Students always thoroughly enjoy this story!  It just happens that our library copy has scribbling on one of the pages, and this also opened the opportunity for us to revisit the best ways to take care of our books.  For students who were not getting books out, they had the opportunity to draw David breaking the rules in the library!

Extra Kinder class- For this class, we read sequels to both How I Became a Pirate and David Gets in Trouble.  The two titles are No, David and Pirate’s Don’t Change Diapers.  Students got especially giggly over David going to school and forgetting his pants!

First Grade- These students got to hear one of my favorite Thanksgiving day stories- One is a Feast for Mouse (Judy Cox, ill. by Jeffery Ebbeler).  I am excited that we are processing a new book from this author- Snow Day for Mouse.  I just love the stories and the pictures in this series!  Students then completed a sequencing activity of all the foods little mouse had piled on for his feast. 

Second Grade- These classes heard Thanksgiving Rules, by Laurie Friedman and Teresa Murfin.  Before we started, we did a little predicting of whether the Rules part meant that Thanksgiving was the best or that there are rules to follow.  Everyone was pleasantly surprised that it means both!  After the story, students were challenged to finish sentences that pertained to the story, using exact words from the story.  I include a word bank on the Epson to help them along.  For students who had time, they also created their own five rules for Thanksgiving.  Answers varied from no vegetables to being kind to everyone.  I love their creativity and sensitivity!

Extra Second grade- I shared the book Turk and Runt: A Thanksgiving Comedy, by Lisa Wheeler. One of the most fun parts of this story is doing all the voices of the characters!  I especially play those up because after we shared the story, we worked on a Readers Theater version of it.  I loved hearing students do their own versions of accents (great chance to work on expression and voice)!  

Third Grade- We read Gracias, The Thanksgiving Turkey, by Joy Cowley and Joe Cepeda).  I enjoyed sharing a story that shows some cultural differences for most of my students, but that others of my students can relate to.  We also enjoyed puzzling out what some of the Spanish words meant.  After the story, students completed a project where they find one book of interest from each of the 10 Dewey areas of our non-fiction area.  This is a modified version of the Empire State Information Fluency Continuum, assessment 3.1.  I especially appreciated that some of my students signed books out from areas of the library that had been unexplored previous to this assignment.

Extra Third Grade- This class and I shared another multi-cultural Thanksgiving Day story, Duck for Turkey Day, by Jacqueline Jules and Kathryn Mitter.  While earlier in the week, students learned a little about a Latino families Thanksgiving, this story gave them the opportunity to hear about a Vietnamese family.  I especially like the end of this book, where the main character hears how different all of her classmates Thanksgivings were from the “normal.”  After the story, students were introduced to the colAR app, and took pictures of their Read- themed drawings they did in honor (late) of International Dot Day.

Fourth Grade- I read Molly’s Pilgrim, by Barbara Cohen.  As we read the story, we referred back to last week, when we explored Plimouth Plantation and the idea of what a stereotype is.  In Molly’s Pilgrim, many of the characters had a pre-conceived notion of what a pilgrim is in the beginning of the story.  After the story, students completed an Alex search for Molly’s Pilgrim, Thanksgiving, and turkey.  I have promised them they will be experts in understanding and using Alex (our online catalog) by the end of the year!

Fifth Grade-   Students heard the book Balloons Over Broadway: the True Story of the Puppeteer of Macy’s Parade, by Melissa Sweet.  What really captured their interest the most was the way that the main character got out of chores as a child!  This book was a 2012 winner of the Siebert award, giving for the best informational book of the previous year.  Students then were tasked with going to the American Library Association’s page on the Sibert Award and learned all about the award.  We also spent a few minutes talking about how to do a citation of this website. 

Extra fifth- We worked together to read through the Readers Theater of The Mayflower Compact, a topic they have been covering in class.  Students always seem to love having the opportunity to participate in reader’s theater. 

Sixth Grade- I read more from Seven Ancient Wonders of the World, by Lynn Curlee, this time focusing on the Ancient Pyramids.  Students could really see my enthusiasm, as this happens to be a topic I am personally very interested in!  They then finished their exploration of our new database, TrueFlix.

Extra Sixth- When students first came in, we watched two very short videos about the Mayflower Compact and then we worked together to read through the Readers Theater of The Mayflower Compact.  Students always seem to love having the opportunity to participate in reader’s theater!