Monday, October 14, 2013

Week of Oct 7


Week of Oct. 7- 11, 2013

Kindergarten- I shared one of my all-time favorite authors with kinder this week, in the book We Share Everything, by Robert Munsch.  Student’s cracked up at the idea of sharing shoes, shirts and pants!  We then talked about sharing library books.  Students had lots of great ideas about being “bucket fillers” and letting their friend borrow the book first, or sharing it in the classroom.   I then suggested to them that they can play Rock, Paper, Scissors, Shoot to decide who gets the book first.  The loved the idea and practiced playing the game for a minute.  We then decorated personalized shelf markers that have their name, barcode, teacher’s name and grade.  I explained these will be their “ticket” to get books out, and the tickets will live with me at the library and be handed out each week.  At the end of the year, they can go home and become bookmarks.  Students chose books from piles at the tables this week again. Once they know how to use those shelf-markers, we will move to the shelves!

Second Kindergarten-Earlier in the day, students had the opportunity to see and go on the Moyers Corners Fire truck.  With this in mind, we read Daisy the Firecow (by Viki Woodworth).  We talked about what kind of animals is usually the fire departments mascot.  We then had the opportunity to go on Bookflix, a great resource our district purchases that pairs fiction stories with nonfiction text.  We watched the short story of Dot the Fire Dog (a more traditional mascot!) and read a nonfiction text called the Very Busy Firehouse.  Students chose their new library books from selections at the table again.

First Grade- For first grade, in honor of fall, I read How to Make an Apple Pie and See the World (by Marjorie Priceman).  I was proud that students were able to make connections to the raw materials the main character collected, and what ingredient that would turn into for the pie.  Students then moved to the tables, and separated fiction and nonfiction apple titles on laminated cards.  It was a great opportunity to discuss Johnny Appleseed, and how, depending on the book, can be classified as fiction or nonfiction. 

Second First grade- no class today.  We quickly did book exchange and went outside for the PTO sponsored Fun Run.  I could not keep up!  Students completed many circles in order to raise money.  We had beautiful weather for it, too!

Second Grade- I have chosen the month of October to focus on mysteries, and so with the second grade, we began reading Nate the Great and the Pillowcase (Sharmat).  I always know when a book is a success, if I have students ask after where those books are, and sure enough, this was the case with these books!  They are a great choice for beginning chapter books for second graders.  We also began a Nate the Great mystery Mad Lib in pairs, and will finish next week.

Second Second Grade- Students arrived a bit late from the Fun Run, so we did not have time for the entire lesson.  I read Who Stole the Mona Lisa (a real life mystery!) by Ruthie Knapp.  Students were absolutely intrigued to learn about the Mona Lisa, and I think we were all disappointed that we ran out of time.  I had planned for students and I to further explore Leondardi daVinci, using PebbleGo, another fantastic electronic resource our district provides.  Something that will definitely be on my back burner!

Third grade- In out Mystery Theme for the month, I read from Judy Moody’s Mini Mysteries and let the student’s guess the solution.  This particular story involved a penguin escaping the cage, and students had to figure out how.  The answer was a stack of ice that had melted.  I told students that it reminded me of a book I had when I was little, entitled Big Max, Worlds Greatest Detective (Kin Platt).  In that book, an elephant escapes his enclosure the same way.  I will share that book with them as soon as I find my childhood copy!  We do also have one other Big Max book in the library.  To continue learning about the organization of the library, students next went to the tables and worked in teams to alphabetize a set of books by authors’ last names.  They learned it is better to go off of the spine label, instead of the cover, because the title sometimes does not differentiate between author and illustrator. 

Second Third Grade- Earlier in the year, I could not decide between two books that I wanted to read.  A classic, Library Lion (Michelle Knudsen), lost by a hair, and students have been begging me to go back to it.  So today was the day!  Students always love the idea of having a chance to disobey rules.  They also find it very funny when the librarian, even with a broken arm, maintains order, and better yet, breaks her own rules in her excitement of seeing the lion again.  Unfortunately, the class was a little late, and the book is quite long, so we did not have a chance to complete our ColAR dot app, but we all agreed that waiting, and having the time to spend on it, is better than rushing through it. 

Fourth Grade- To kick off the genre study that fourth grade will be working on throughout the school year, I read Joe Bright and the Seven Genre Dudes (by Jackie Mims Hopkins).  Students then completed a cross-word puzzle that differentiated between the different genres, and we reviewed it as a group.

Second Fourth Grade- I read the mystery picture book, Web Files (Palatini), which is written in an old style mystery.  Palatini uses a lot of double meanings, such as the Dirty Rat being an actual dirty rat, and the dirty rat that was guilty of the crimes.  Another one is “foul play” at the barn.  It is always interesting to see how many of these double meanings the students pick up on.  Students and I as a large group then completed a genre riddle matchup, to review the genres from Joe Bright.

Fifth Grade- We finished reading Conjure Brother, from the book The Dark 30, Southern Tales of the Supernatural.  Students were torn in deciding if the brother was all a dream or not!  We then continued our work on doing a close reading of the district Acceptable Use Policy of the internet.  We talked about the character theme of the month, which is integrity (doing the right thing when no one is watching), and how the district can and does follow inter-net use, and will report inappropriate or illegal use.  This is such a tremendously important lesson, when inter-net use is becoming so easy on phones, iPads, laptops, etc.  Students are now fully aware that loss of inter-net is the result of inappropriate use.  This lesson falls under the New York State Education Law regarding Instruction on Internet Safety and Appropriate Use, which requires cyber safety to be taught to all students.

Sixth Grade- We continued the story of Mongoose, from the Library Card (Spinelli).  One class finished! Sixth grade also finished the close read of the district Acceptable Use Policy of the internet.  We talked about the character theme of the month, which is integrity (doing the right thing when no one is watching), and how the district can and does follow inter-net use, and will report inappropriate or illegal use.  This is such a tremendously important lesson, when inter-net use is becoming so easy on phones, iPads, laptops, etc.  Students are now fully aware that loss of inter-net is the result of inappropriate use.  This lesson falls under the New York State Education Law regarding Instruction on Internet Safety and Appropriate Use, which requires cyber safety to be taught to all students.